Amazon worker in Sacramento CA tests positive for coronavirus

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A worker tested positive for coronavirus in Amazon’s warehouse near Sacramento International Airport, making the sprawling facility one of 11 Amazon-operated warehouses to be invaded by COVID-19.

Spokesman Timothy Carter confirmed on Friday that an employee has contracted the diseases and is “recovering.”

“We follow the directions of health officials and medical experts, and take extreme measures to keep our site workers safe,” said Carter in an email to The Sacramento Bee.

Amazon’s business has exploded since the coronavirus pandemic forced the closure of most brick and mortar retailers across the country. The disclosure of the coronavirus infection occurred the same day that the e-commerce giant announced that it had hired 800 other workers in Sacramento in the past month to meet the demand.

But as sales have exploded, so have Amazon’s methods of keeping workers safe. Sacramento workers complained to The Bee last month that Amazon respected three feet of social distance, although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended at least six feet of separation.

The three-foot orientation came from the World Health Organization. In late March, Amazon moved up to the six-foot standard.

Last month, the Washington Post, which belongs to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, reported that employees tested positive for the coronavirus at 10 other Amazon facilities across the country, including one in the Moreno Valley in the Inland Empire in California.

Any Amazon warehouse worker who tests positive or is quarantined receives up to two weeks’ wages, said Carter. He added that every time a case of COVID-19 is confirmed, every employee who works in the building is informed, not just those who work near the employee who has been diagnosed with the disease.

Known within the company as SMF1, the Sacramento site opened in 2017, one of a chain of warehouses that Amazon opened in California to accelerate deliveries to customers.

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